Theatre / Alma Tavern and Theatre

Review: Mrs Green, Alma Tavern and Theatre – ‘A gaze at the aftermath of Brexit through the lens of love’’

By Sophie Sherman , Sunday Feb 20, 2022

Italian drama student, Isabella, played by Julia Messina, and French finance lawyer, Jacques, played by Victor Ciri, meet in a London park– the ultimate spot to begin a quintessential British romance. Yet, all warm fuzzy feelings are subdued by the recurring, unavoidable conversation of Brexit.

The director, Flavio Marigliani, employs a disrupted, intertwined structure to embody the atmosphere of Britain during this period.

Overlapping multilingual monologues instil the different backgrounds the three individuals came from, and how it influences their perception of natives, travel, and culture in Europe.

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Mrs Green’s recollections of traveling through Italy draw attention to the ‘old days’; how close and nonchalantly tourists travelled through Europe.

Whilst each character gave their monologue, the other two were oblivious and kept to their own private spheres, perhaps reflecting the isolating nature of living in a multicultural urban centre – especially during this politically tumultuous period.

At first the two young adults discuss the changing international climate with ease, even seeing the comedy in it, before the reality of its immediate impact weighs in on the couple in different ways. Isabella’s political and activist inclinations contrast Jacques’ practical concern for relocating wherever his job can take him.

Ominous reports of David Cameron resound overhead at various intervals, which at first causes very little reaction in Mrs Green, played by Dyanne White. Yet her passive attitude to the political developments gradually intensify, until the end, whereby various posters demonstrating her anger and confusion cover the backdrop curtain.

(l-r) Julia Messina as Isabella, Dyanne White as Mrs Green, Victor Ciri as Jacques – photo: Violetta Canitano

Whilst her protesting is undoubtedly somewhat comical – there is a child-like innocence in her hastily scribbled signs, as one poster simply reads ‘Brexshit!’. But all jokes aside, her final gaze out at us leaves a solemn mark.

The lights dim as Mrs Green gulps down her wine (just as the play began) and having decided to keep hold of Isabella’s suitcase (despite no need for it anymore), we are left with the same exact image as the show opened with. But there is the definite air that things are not exactly the same, and never will be.

The audience is in no doubt that Isabella’s promise over the phone to visit London again in a month falls short of any certainty. Returning to her magazine, we ponder whether Mrs Green is feeling defeat, or nostalgia, or both.

Julia Messina as Isabella, Victor Ciri as Jacques – photo: Violetta Canitano

For more information about Mrs Green and Teatro Multilingue’s other theatre and film work, visit www.teatromultilingue.com.

 

Main photo: Violetta Canitano

Read more: Multilingual theatre show ‘Mrs Green’ comes to The Alma Tavern

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